Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Running Away to Another Country

Collapse
X
  •  
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • ccsmod13
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hi there,

    Thanks for reaching out to NRS and sharing a bit about what is going on at home. It is unfair that your sister is treating you this way and making you feel scared at home. You deserve to be treated in a way that makes you feel safe and wanted. We truly want to be a support for you during this challenging time. Perhaps having a safe space to talk about what is going on will help you feel better and brainstorm some ideas you hadn't previously thought of. We are here 24/7 to listen and help. We look forward to hearing from you soon, so that we can brainstorm some ideas for making your situation better together.

    You can contact us by phone at 800-786-2929 or use our online chat services by clicking on the chat option on our website 1800runaway.org.

    Take care,
    NRS

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I am 12 years old I’m trying to run away because my sister is yelling and trying to get me arrested and I did’nt do anything

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod1
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hey there,

    Thanks so much for reaching out and sharing a little bit about what’s been going on, we know that it takes a lot of courage. It's so great to hear about your international dreams! We aren't legal experts here at NRS but generally speaking, to immigrate to another country you would need to have a passport, financial backing, and a visa which would require a visit to the South Korean embassy here in the US. It may be beneficial to speak with someone like a school counselor/advisor to see if they can help you locate a study abroad program that would let you live and study in another country.

    If you’d like to go over what’s going on in depth, or if you’d like to explore other options that you may have available to you, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-800-RUNAWAY. You can also chat us by clicking on the “CHAT” button on top of our homepage. We’re open 24/7 and here to listen and support you in any way we can.

    Stay safe,
    NRS

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Hey! I'm a thirteen year old girl. I have always wanted to live in a different country. I find the thought of that very enjoyable, and I know I would be more happy. I wanted to move with my family, but they don't want to. So I asked my parents, "can I go if I find a program thatll take me there? Or find a family? " They didn't seem to mind, so I looked into it. I couldn't find any solutions for me, so I kind of just wanna run away there. I mean, I would have to fly, but that's it. I want to go to South Korea. It's been my dream for years, and I feel like I should do something to make it happen other than wait for the years to pass by. Is there any way I can do this? Or find a family to take me in in Korea? Or is my entire dream to far fetched for my age? I apologize if this is an innapropriate comment, considering I'm wanting to leave home when I have a loving family(I'm not in the best living situation though, and my family strugles financially, so why not try to make the best of my life and explore?)

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod1
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hey there,

    Thanks so much for reaching out and sharing a little bit about what’s been going on, we know that it takes a lot of courage. It must be really hard to live in a home with so much tension. Running away is a big decision and it can be very stressful to figure out what you want to do. If you are an American citizen and are trying to return it may be beneficial to reach out to your local American embassy to see what your legal options are. The National Runaway Safeline is located in the United States of America (USA). Our knowledge of helpful community-based resources and our understanding of youth in crisis-related laws is limited to the USA. If you are located in a country outside of the USA, you can use this link to check out Kids Health Phone, a Canadian Helpline: https://kidshelpphone.ca/. They also offer online assistance since you are unable to call.
    We hope that by reaching out to a local resource, you are able to get the support you need from an organization that understands the laws and circumstances that affect youth in your country.

    Be safe,
    NRS

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Hi there,
    I'm not sure if this thread is still active but I need some advice, beyond calling the hotline (my parents check my phone records, so this would raise suspicion).
    I am 17 and am looking to run away from Canada to the US (I know my parents will never find me there). I am a citizen, and am trying to escape my emotionally abusive, manipulative and narcissistic parents. I want to run away, but would like to be able to land on my feet when I escape, and hopefully, one day be able to enroll in uni and get a stable job, but right now, I just need to get out. How can I go about planning my escape?

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod15
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hi there,
    Thank you for writing to us here at National Runaway Safeline (NRS). We understand it takes great courage to reach out, and we appreciate you sharing a little bit about what’s going on. We want you to know that we are here as support to help you through this challenging time. We can best help by phone or chat as NRS is unable to respond more than twice by email or bulletin for assistance. If you would like to talk more in detail and share more about how we can help specifically, please call or chat soon.
    Our contact information is 1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929); www.1800runaway.org (click on the chat button).
    If you are at risk of any danger or feeling unsafe, we encourage you to reach out to 911 or seek emergency assistance immediately.
    We hope to hear from you soon.
    Be safe,
    NRS

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    hello hello

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod7
    commented on Guest's reply
    Thank you for contacting the National Runaway Safeline.

    It sounds like you have given your plan a lot of thought, and have a very thorough timeline planned out.

    You mention that you won’t need to show your passport to go from Guam to the United States, but since Guam is a territory of the United States, you would need to show your passport upon arrival there. https://www.visitguam.com/about-guam...t-formalities/

    If that is not a hurdle, have you thought about what kind of job you will get in Guam? If you will be under 16 when you get there, it seems like you may need to get an employment certificate from the government and the form requires the signature of a parent/guardian. You will also need certain personal identification documents for the application and tax forms. https://www.dol.gov/whd/state/certification.htm#Guam
    https://www.govguamdocs.com/dol/docs...ertificate.pdf
    Do you have any connections to find a place to live for the four or five months you plan on being in Guam? It might be a good idea to try to picture what your life will look like when you’re there – how long it may take you to find work, where you will stay, how you will feed yourself.

    Moving on to your being in the United States. If you were to runaway to the US, during the time that you are not emancipated and still under your parents’ guardianship, it is possible that anyone that houses you could be charged with harboring a runaway.

    And while we are not legal experts, we can tell you that emancipation can be a lengthy and expensive process. It sounds like you have really thought this through, but it is not something to enter into lightly. You may have to argue for yourself in a hearing about why and how you should be able to live independently.

    One resource you may want to use as you are working through your plan is https://www.childhelplineinternation...pline-network/
    They can put you in touch with someone in your area who can listen to what you’re experiencing and help you figure out options.

    One option that you may have is trying to talk with your parents/guardians about how you are feeling and your desire to return to the US. The easiest way to live apart from your parents/guardians is to get their written approval to do so. They may be understanding and willing to work with you to figure out a way for you to return and a place for you to live.

    We wish you luck with everything you are experiencing. We are not experts on international law, but you can always call or chat us if you are in the states and need help.

    -NRS

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I’m currently 14 right now and I’ve moved to two different countries in the past six months. I moved from the US, Guam, and the Philippines and I want to move back to the states where I would have a more stable life and finish school. I’ve made a plan to go back to the US but it wouldn’t happen till I’m probably 15 or 16. I would run away at this age so I could get a job more easily if I was on my own. I would runaway and spend the money on a plane trip from the Philippines to Guam (because of the less strict security of commons and runaways). I would continue to live there for four or five months to save up enough money to sustain myself and buy a plane ticket to the US. Guam to US is also considered a domestic flight so I wouldn’t have to show my passport. From there I would fly as an adult (or an unaccompanied minor) for a safer flight with less people asking questions. From there I would go from Guam to Honolulu to Atlanta bc if the connecting flight. I would arrive at Atlanta to visit my friends and prepare to leave to Colorado where I could emancipate myself and not have to worry about the law after me. I would continue my college courses that I would’ve taken in the Philippines and get a better job that would help in straighten up my life. This is my plan and I would like to know if there are any flaws in it. I would also want to know if there are any legal concerns I should be looking after.

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod9
    commented on Guest's reply
    Thank you for reaching out to us at the National Runaway Safeline. It sounds like you are in a difficult situation, and we understand it takes courage to reach out for help. The National Runaway Safeline is located in the United States of America (USA). Our knowledge of helpful community based resources and our understanding of youth in crisis related laws is limited to the USA. If you are located in a country outside of the USA, you can use this link to find a youth helpline in or around your country: https://www.childhelplineinternation...pline-network/.
    We hope that by reaching out to a local resource, you are able to get the support you need from an organization that understands the laws and circumstances that affect youth in your country.

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I'm running away to Europe and I need to know how to get a job in another country. I'm 18 and want to get out of America.

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod3
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hi there,
    Thanks for reaching out! We really appreciate you sharing about your story and your dreams are important. It’s a great start to do some research and looking into the logistics of what it would take to leave the country. One of our goals here is to make sure we can support you with staying safe if you decided to leave in regards to where you might stay, how you might survive, and what would a backup plan if things don’t work on with living in Korea. We aren’t experts in passports, but from a general understanding there are cost and permissions you would need as a minor to get a passport. It is very much needed to be able to travel and if there was a runaway report filed on you then the airlines would be notified to not let you on the plane in most cases.
    Your dreams are important and valuable and getting support from others can be tough. It may be good to think about developing a plan and talking with people that you trust to talk through how you might be able to move forward. We are here 24/7 and would be more than happy to talk with you about your options and general information through calling us at 1-800-RUNAWAY or access our chat through our website at 1800RUNAWAY.org.
    Best of luck,
    NRS

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied

    I'm 14 years old and I want to become a singer. You can say I live in a really abusive household. Like nobody gets along with me and my parents are against my dream so damn much! I've been trying to pursue them for the past 3 months but now I am done. I am planning to run away to South Korea and continue to pursue my dream with my other friends out there in Korea. But the only problem is that I don't have a passport or enough money. And I know passport is really important. I will be really greatful if you guys can tell me if it's really that important to have a passport and if it's okay for an unaccompanied minor to runaway to south korea.
    please help me I am wanting to run away on 15 of july please try to contact as fast as possible.Again I request you to please see my concerning about the situation and my carrier goals.

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod15
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hi, and thank you for writing to us here at National Runaway Safeline (NRS). We understand it takes great courage to reach out, and we appreciate you sharing a little bit about what’s going on. It sounds like things at home have been difficult for you and possibly abusive. We’re sorry you’re going through this. No one deserves to be hurt in any way.

    If you are at risk of any danger or feeling unsafe, we encourage you to reach out to 911 or seek emergency assistance immediately.

    When harm or abuse happen at home, you have the right to report it. If you feel like reporting is an option you want to explore, you may find this website helpful: https://www.childhelp.org/child-abuse/. Child Help USA (1-800-422-4453) is an organization that helps protect minors from being harmed. We can also help you to file a report if that’s the route you are considering. You can also reach out to someone at your school like a trusted teacher our counselor about what you’re going through.
    You mentioned leaving home when you turn 16 and about the feasibility of traveling to France or Russia via boat. While we are not experts on the law, and may not be able to comment on the feasibility of traveling by boat, we can tell you that 18 is generally the age that an individual may leave home without parent permission. If you are under 18 and leave home, your parent/guardian may file you as a runaway and you may be returned home. Also, those you stay with may run the risk of being charged with harboring a runaway. For more specifics on the law, the local non-emergency police or legal aid may better answer legal questions (including the feasibility of traveling as a stowaway).

    If you'd like to talk in more detail about your situation, would like resources or to discuss options please call 1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929) or chat with us (www.1800RUNAWAY.org) as we can best help by phone or chat. Best, NRS
Previously entered content was automatically saved. Restore or Discard.
Auto-Saved
x
Insert: Thumbnail Small Medium Large Fullsize Remove  
x
x
Working...
X