Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How far would police go to find me?

Collapse
X
  •  
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • ccsmod15
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hello,

    Thanks so much for reaching out to us. It seems like your sister is struggling with the mandated visitation that has been ordered, and she plans on leaving with the consent of one of her parents. It sounds like you have questions regarding what the police will do if she leaves, and what might happen to you if you take her in.

    Although we are not legal experts, from what we understand, if your sister is a minor in your state and she leaves without the consent of her legal guardian, they can report her as a runaway to the local police department. It is up to the local police to decide whether they would take the report given that one of her parents either knows about it, or gave her consent to leave. If they choose to take the report, it is up to local police to decide whether to look for her, and from what we understand, if they choose to look for her, they typically would go to places a parent or legal guardian thinks the youth might have gone to. Although it is rare, anyone that allows a runaway youth to stay with them is at risk of being charged with harboring a runaway, or aiding and abetting in the delinquency of a minor. The best way to confirm what local police might do, as well as whether you would run the risk of being charged if she is found with you, is to reach out a local legal aid organization or to the non-emergency number for the local police department where your sister and her legal guardian reside.

    Please know that we are here to support you and your sister regardless of what you decide. We cannot tell you what to do, but we will do our best to help you identify resources to keep everyone safe as you both explore your next steps. If you would like to discuss your situation in more detail, we encourage you to reach out to us via chat or phone. You can reach us 24/7 at 1.800.RUNAWAY (786.2929), or via chat by visiting our website www.1800runaway.org (click on the chat button). We are here to listen, here to help. Stay safe!

    -NRS

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Hello, I love in Oregon and currently my other set of parents have the right to mandate visitation from my sister, which they use. My sister plans to run away with my one set of parents knowing about it. Will the police track her down? If I take care of her, will I get in trouble? I am sixteen but free of visitation and live elsewhere.

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod13
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hi there,

    Thank you for taking the time to contact us here at NRS, and we appreciate you sharing a bit about your situation with us. It sounds like there is a lot you are faced with at home and you are thinking leaving might be your best option. While we are not legal experts, we can speak generally about the laws and protocols regarding minors leaving home.

    18 is usually the age you are able to leave home without permission from your parents. If you leave home as a minor your parents can report you as a runaway to the police. Running away is not illegal, but it is a status offense. This means your parents can ask police to return you home if they know where you are staying. In most cases, police do not actively search for a runaway. Your name would be flagged in a police database as a runaway if you come into contact with law enforcement for any reason. Usually runaway reports depend on how much effort parents put into it. While police will not necessarily search for you, they will check in on places where your parents suggest you might. From what we know it is not very common, but harboring charges are a risk for anyone that you stay with.

    It sounds like being at home has been a stressful situation for you and we want you to know that you are not alone. If you would like to talk more about your situation, please do not hesitate to contact us directly by phone or live chat. 1-800-786-2929; 1800runaway.org.

    Be safe,
    NRS

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I want to know how far the police would look if I ran away I’m planning on running away to someplace that’s almost a full days drive. Do you think they would look for me anywhere besides the state I live in? I also want to go stay with my boyfriend he’s the one that lives almost 14 hours away from me. He is willing to hide me but I don’t want him to get arrested for hiding me or harboring me. I can’t handle living with my parents anymore. They make me feel like a mistake and I hate it.

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod3
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hello! Thanks for reaching out to us here at National Runaway Safeline. We know that it can take a lot of courage to reach out for support, and we're glad you took that step. We're sorry you're having a tough time with your parents and that it's affecting your mental health. When thinking about running away, it's definitely a good idea to spend some time really thinking things over and making a decision that feels well thought out and in your best interests. Kudos to you for doing your own research before diving in headfirst.

    While we can't speak in certainties on what *might* happen in your particular situation, it is possible that you could be tracked down through your mobile devices when you leave. It's also good to know that if your parents pay your phone bill, they can access your records. This means that they can see who you've been communicating with, when you've been communicating with them, and general locations. If you leave and don't want to be found, using the mobile device that your parents pay for and/or any form of social media are probably going to be things that you'd want to avoid.

    As you continue to think through running away, it's always a good idea to try and have a plan in place. If you feel really tied to your electronic devices and social media, what will that look like for you? Beyond escaping some, we also rely on our phones for safety, to stay in touch with friends and family, and to get around. If you know that there's potential for you to be located through your phone and/or social media use, but you feel really connected to both, what's next? This is a good time to think through some of that.

    If you'd like to talk more about your particular situation, please feel free to reach out to us by phone (1-800-RUNAWAY) or chat (www.1800runaway.org) We're available 24/7 through both, and are always happy to listen, and to help.

    Take care,

    NRS

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I'm greatly considering running away when I get a little older (but still considered a minor) I have bad mental health and my parents are a big part of why, I know I might just be making an impulse decision but I am really trying to thoroughly think this through and do a lot of research hence the wait to go through with it, I watched a professional-looking video on how to run away and it said that if I really didn't want to be found that I had to leave behind all of my mobile devices because they could be tracked and I really don't wanna do that and I know that may sound pretty stuck but I experience unhealthy escapism through them and I want to know if the tracking thing was true or not, and if it is, is it avoidable and what can I do to avoid it?

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod15
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hi there,
    Thank you for writing to us here at National Runaway Safeline (NRS). We understand it takes great courage to reach out, and we appreciate you sharing a little bit about what’s going on. We want you to know that we are here as support to help you through this challenging time. We can best help by phone or chat as NRS is unable to respond more than twice by email or bulletin for assistance. If you would like to talk more in detail and share more about how we can help specifically, please call or chat soon.
    Our contact information is 1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929); www.1800runaway.org (click on the chat button).
    If you are at risk of any danger or feeling unsafe, we encourage you to reach out to 911 or seek emergency assistance immediately.
    We hope to hear from you soon.
    Be safe,
    NRS

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I want to run away, but I don't have anywhere I am sure I can go that is out of state. I don't want to risk staying in the area and getting caught. I would like to hear from runaways who have run away as a minor and were not caught

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod6
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hello and thank you for reaching out to the National Runaway Safeline. It sounds like you are going through some intense stuff and we want to support you. Whether or not you feel like you need to run away is up to you and whether or not you feel safe where you are. We would be happy to help you in whatever way we can. We can provide referrals to mental health resources, shelters, legal advocacy, among other things. We can also just talk you through whatever your situation is and help you figure out what your options are. We aim to empower youths and we prioritize their safety and their well-being. If you are interested in anything that we have to offer, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at 1-800-786-2929 or chat us at 1800runaway.org.

    Take care,
    NRS

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I am 13 and want to run away-kind of. I need some advice or something to confirm my thoughts or to sell me on the idea or against the idea. I don't want to run away exactly but I don't want to be at home anymore either. I really just can't stand being in my own house anymore and at this point, it is either running away, getting help or dying.

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod3
    commented on Guest's reply
    Thanks for connecting with us here at National Runaway Safeline; we know that it can be tough to reach out for support, and we're glad you did.

    It sounds like you and your family were all pretty surprised to find out that your sister ran away, and then, in learning more about the reasons that led to that decision. While it may be tough to navigate through the reasons behind your sister leaving, especially if she broke some trust in stealing so much money, it really shows that you all care about her. Unfortunately, getting in contact with her might not be the easiest thing to do if she's not ready to talk. If there's someone in your family who she is still communicating with, it might be a good idea to have them initially maintain that line of communication with her. They can serve as sort of buffer between your sister and the rest of the family, even if it's just to provide brief updates confirming that she's safe. If there's no one in the family that she's keeping in touch with, another option could be to reach out to her friends and try to stay in touch with her that way. If either of these two options are available, it's important to keep in mind that any messages sent through that buffer person should be positive and encouraging. If the overall goal is to reestablish communication, you want her to feel safe in doing so.

    We also offer a messaging service at NRS. This means that your sister can call us and leave a message for someone in your family, and we'll relay it to them. When we do so, you can then leave a message back to her, which she'll be given the next time she calls back. This works the opposite way as well: someone from your family can call and leave a message for your sister. The only difference is that we are unable to deliver the message to her unless she calls us directly and requests it. If this is a service you'd like to learn more about or move forward with, you can call us anytime at 1-800-RUNAWAY. And if you know of someone who is still in touch with your sister, but they aren't necessarily open to giving her a detailed message, you can pass our number along to them as well, letting them know of the messaging service.

    If you have any additional questions, please feel free to reach out. We're available 24/7 by phone, as well as through our online chat.

    Hang in there.

    NRS

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Hello,
    My sister ran away at age 19 a week ago and it was a complete shock for the whole family since there were no signs whatsoever of any sort of distress from her. Apparently, she told the program that she was being "emotionally abused" and "forced to get married to someone she didn't want" Again, all of this is a complete shocker for everyone since she showed no signs of not wanting to get married. My question is what is the best way to be able to get in contact with our loved one since no one is able to help due to confidentiality laws. She stole a lot of money when she ran away so we can technically press charges, but our main concern is making sure she's safe And for the parents to be able to talk to her to get some peace of mind. She's never been away from her parents for even one night and they're health is really deteriorating from all of this. Please let me know if there are mediation programs or anything at all that can help us reconnect with our loved in.

    Thank you

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod7
    commented on Guest's reply
    HI there, thanks for reaching out. It's clear that you have been through more than anyone should have to go through with the abuse at home and the toll it has taken on your mental health. We are so glad you are still here with us, you deserve to be safe at home and to have the opportunity to thrive. We are glad you are hopeful for the future, there is hope that things will get better. Here at NRS, we truly want to be a support for you during this difficult time.

    We understand it takes great courage to reach out, and we appreciate you sharing a little bit about what’s going on. It sounds like you’re quite overwhelmed by things at home right now and you mentioned being harmed. We’re sorry you’re going through this. You don't deserve to be hurt in any way. If you are at risk of any danger or feeling unsafe, we encourage you to reach out to 911 or seek emergency assistance immediately. You may also be able to report any mistreatment to CPS. Child Help USA 1-800-422-4453 www.childhelp.org is an organization that helps protect minors from being harmed. They can tell you more about how CPS could respond to your situation. If you ever need assistance calling out to CPS to make an abuse or neglect report please call is at 1-800-RUNAWAY.

    You also mentioned a past attempt and struggling with bulimia, you shouldn't have to go through those things alone and there is support for you. You can always contact us or www.neda.org or www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org if you need someone to talk to. If you feel like you are in immediate danger, please call 911.

    These are all excellent questions, some of which we can answer generally. We are not legal experts or experts on how police communicate, rather we can speak generally about runaway laws and what could happen.

    We are unaware of a transportation option that an unaccompanied 14 year old can access. You usually have to show ID to get on transit. Here at NRS, we are primarily concerned with your safety, so if you are able to get rides or rely on others for transportation, we strongly encourage you only to interact with people you know and trust. Putting your trust in a stranger could put you at high risk for exploitation or violence.

    So generally speaking, if you are filed as a runaway. Police would only look in suspecting places for you, like addresses your guardians would tell them to visit. So it is possible your parents could give police your friends' information so they can knock on some doors. There would not be an alert such as an amber alert put out for you if you are suspected of running away. Police are generally only on that high of alert when there is reason to believe that something bad has happened to you. Typically, the way police could tell you are a runaway in an unsuspecting place is if you are stopped for another reason and they run your name and see that you are listed as a runaway. We do not know if police would go into your email, especially if it's secret. Generally speaking, running away is a status offense and you wouldn't have charges brought against you. If you already have a status offense, it's possible there could be local youth court programs that could make it so their are consequences if you go through it. That would be up to your local laws and court programs.

    Money might be hard for you to make as a 14 year old. Again, for your safety, it's important to stay away from jobs that might take advantage of you being young and unaccompanied. So you might try to save up as much as possible, and have a plan with people that you can rely on for food and other basic needs before you leave.

    Please do not hesitate to call or chat us if you have more questions or need to talk. We are here for you.

    1-800-RUNAWAY; www.1800runaway.org

    Best,

    NRS

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Hi, I’m looking to run away from home because I recently got into a lot of trouble for contacting a friend, having a boyfriend, cutting, concealing a suicide attempt, and having bad bulimia. I am constantly emotionally and sometimes physically abused by my family, and they are also trying to convert me back to their religion. I am looking to get on a bus to get out of state and start a new life, because I know I can take care of myself. My questions are:

    Is there an alternative option for getting to my preferred state, other than by bus?
    Is there a viable way to lie about my age and alter my appearance to get on the bus? (I am 14, the unaccompanied rider age is 17+)
    Can the police track a factory reset phone?
    Do policemen send a “be on the lookout for” to the police system in other states, or just the one that I am currently in.
    If I am caught, are the police required to bring me home or are there other options?
    Can charges be brought on me, since I have run away once before but returned home on my own, less than 12 hours later?
    Is getting a job or busking for money in my chosen state a safe option immediately, or should I lay low until I run low on money?
    Will the police track my friends down and figure out where I’ve gone, since I have mentioned running away to this state a lot (I have given them some false information via a secret email address just in case because I am paranoid).
    Will the police be able to find my secret email and will they actively search for me if they get a lead off my deleted search history or email?

    Thank you for your time,

    Hopeful for the Future

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod2
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hello There,
    Thank you for reaching out to The National Runaway Safeline, we are here to listen and here to help. It sounds like you are going through a difficult time, and we want you to know you are not alone.
    You do not deserve to be abused and you do have a right to make a report. You can make a report by calling Child Help at: 1800-422-4453. You can also give us a call or chat with us online and we can help you with making a report.
    We are not legal experts but we do have some information on running away. If you were to leave your home without permission your legal guardian does have the right to file a runaway report. If the police were to find you they most likely would bring you back home. You could consider talking with an adult or school counselor about what you are going through at home.
    We hope that this information will be helpful to you in your situation. If you have any other questions or would like to explore more options, please give us a call. We are here 24/7 to listen and to provide support. Best of luck!
    NRS
Previously entered content was automatically saved. Restore or Discard.
Auto-Saved
x
Insert: Thumbnail Small Medium Large Fullsize Remove  
x
x
Working...
X