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Can I Be Emancipated Even Through My Parents Refuse to Let Me Move Out

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Im a minor 16, and I want to move out of my parents house and get emancipated. My parents and I dont get along at all If I called the cops and asked them to tell my parents to let me move in with another family member could they?

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  • ccsmod5
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hi there,

    Thanks for reaching out, we hope to help as best we can. We're sorry you're going through this at home, you don't deserve to be hurt in any way and should be able to feel safe & comfortable in your own house. Child Help USA 1-800-422-4453 www.childhelp.org is an organization that helps protect minors from being harmed. It may also be a good place to explore options for staying with another family member or someone you trust as far as transferring custody.

    It sounds like you are interested in emancipation. We are not legal experts, but we can help you get a general sense of how emancipation works. Our general understanding is some states offer formal emancipation statutes while others do not unfortunately. Laws vary depending on your location, but in many states a minor can petition the court for emancipation to take responsibility for their own care before they turn 18. Generally speaking, courts are wary about granting emancipation. In most cases, you would have to prove in court that you have an income and can care for yourself financially, and that you are able to live separately from your parents. It also helps to be in good standing at school. The court will also factor in the mental and physical welfare of your parents in order to establish your best interest. Usually your legal guardian would have to agree to this in court. Once you are emancipated, you can legally choose where you live, but you might still find that you cannot sign a lease or build credit until you turn 18. The emancipation process can take several months or up to a year, and may cost money in the form of court fees and other expenses. Usually, the best way to learn about emancipation in your state is to contact a lawyer. You may also find information at your county family court. We can look up legal aid resources that may be able to help you with the process. Please do not hesitate to call or chat if you have questions, need legal resources, or need to talk. We can explore your situation, go over all your options, and come up with a plan and resources to deal with your situation over the phone or on live chat. We are looking forward to hearing from you soon, and wish you the best of luck.

    Please reach out soon so that we may offer support and resources to you. Our number is 1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929).

    Be safe,

    NRS

  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Can I get emancipated even if my parent refuses to let me?
    I am 15 years old and I will be 16 in 4 months. I am wanting to move out and I do not have a job currently because my mother won't let me, but I can get emancipated, get a job, and then get an apartment with roommates to help with rent. I have been looking at apartments and I found a 3 bedroom that is completely affordable for 4 of us. I heard there are emancipation fee's and I was wondering I can hold on to those fees until I could pay them?
    My reason as to why I am wanting to get emancipated is because of my mom, we never get along and I do not agree with her rules. She can be mentally abusive at times and there have been times that I have gotten in trouble and I left the house with bruises on me after those situations. She says she is allowed to but I am positive she can't. I refused to give her my phone so they were forcing it from me and I got hit multiple times. My mom used to threaten emancipation on me but now that I know what it is I want it and she wouldn't approve.
    I need some advice so if I can get help please I would appreciate that so much!

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod15
    commented on Guest's reply
    It sounds like you are interested in emancipation. We are not legal experts, but we can help you get a general sense of how emancipation works. Our general understanding is some states offer formal emancipation statutes while others do not unfortunately. Laws vary depending on your location, but in many states a minor can petition the court for emancipation to take responsibility for their own care before they turn 18. Generally speaking, courts are wary about granting emancipation. In most cases, you would have to prove in court that you have an income and can care for yourself financially, and that you are able to live separately from your parents. It also helps to be in good standing at school. The court will also factor in the mental and physical welfare of your parents in order to establish your best interest. Usually your legal guardian would have to agree to this in court. Once you are emancipated, you can legally choose where you live, but you might still find that you cannot sign a lease or build credit until you turn 18. The emancipation process can take several months or up to a year, and may cost money in the form of court fees and other expenses. Usually, the best way to learn about emancipation in your state is to contact a lawyer. You may also find information at your county family court. We can look up legal aid resources that may be able to help you with the process. Please do not hesitate to call or chat if you have questions, need legal resources, or need to talk. We can explore your situation, go over all your options, and come up with a plan and resources to deal with your situation over the phone or on live chat. We are looking forward to hearing from you soon, and wish you the best of luck.
    NRS

  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Can I get emancipated if my parents doesn't want me to? I get verbal abuse and get hit and when I say something my mom says it my fault and get mad if I tell anyone else and makes it seem like I'm the bad guy I'm willing to wait till I'm 16 to get emancipated but i know for a fact she would get mad and yell at me if I ask her to sign

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod15
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hi –



    Thanks for contacting us here at National Runaway Safeline (NRS). We are not legal experts, but can give a general sense of how emancipation works.  It’s great that you and your boyfriend both have stable jobs and are saving.



    Laws on emancipation vary from state to state. Many, but not all states allow a minor to petition the court for emancipation before they turn 18. In most cases, you (and, separately, your boyfriend) would have to prove in court that you have an income and can care for yourself financially, and that you are able to live separately from your parents.  It also helps to be in good standing at school.  



    Typically, your legal guardian would have to agree to your emancipation in court. The emancipation process can take several months or up to a year, and may cost money (court fees and other expenses). Courts tend to be wary about granting emancipation.  



    Generally speaking, the best way to learn about emancipation in your state is to contact a lawyer. You may also find information at your county family court. We can look up legal aid resources for you in your state if you contact us via phone or chat.



    Please do not hesitate to call or text if you have questions, need legal resources, or want to talk. We can explore your situation, go over options, and help develop a plan.  Our contact information is 1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929); www.1800runaway.org (click on the chat button).



    We are looking forward to hearing from you soon, and wish you the best of luck.



    Be safe, NRS

  • Guest
    Guest replied
    My boyfriend and I was to get emancipated but we don't think our parents are going to let us is there anyway we could get emancipated without their permission we both have stable jobs and have been saving for a very long time

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod15
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hi there,

    Emancipation can definitely be a confusing process, and we're glad you are reaching out for help. We are not legal experts but we do have some general knowledge on the process. Not all states offer emancipation, but in states that do, youth usually have to be 16, provide for themselves financially and physically with housing. To our knowledge the process can be easier with the consent of your legal guardian or parent but it is not always necessary. A good way to explore this option more concretely is to reach out to a legal aid resource in your state. The process generally requires a lawyer and talking with an expert may help you decide if this is something you would like to pursue. We would be happy to connect you with a legal aid resource in your are or state if you give us a call at 1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929) or live chat with us through our website, www.1800runaway.org. We are here 24/7 and would be happy to help if we can. We hope to hear from you soon.

    Best of luck,
    NRS

  • Guest
    Guest replied
    I'm just confused about the whole emancipation thing. I want to get emancipated but only one biological parent agrees to it whereas the other does not. I am 16, mature, and can financially take care of myself but the biological parent will make sure I don't get emancipated and would say Im not mature or make something up to make me look bad the parent doesn't even let me leave the house or go anywhere I've tried to go to a family member's house to get away from this parent and the parent didn't let me leave. I don't know what to do I've been through hell my whole life and I just want to be happy please help

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod15
    commented on Guest's reply
    It sounds like you are interested in emancipation. We are not legal experts, but we can help you get a general sense of how emancipation works. Our general understanding is some states offer formal emancipation statutes while others do not unfortunately. As far as we know you may not need any parent permission or you may need both because laws vary depending on your location. But in many states a minor can petition the court for emancipation to take responsibility for their own care before they turn 18. Generally speaking, courts are wary about granting emancipation. In most cases, you would have to prove in court that you have an income and can care for yourself financially, and that you are able to live separately from your parents. It also helps to be in good standing at school. The court will also factor in the mental and physical welfare of your parents in order to establish your best interest. Usually your legal guardian would have to agree to this in court. Once you are emancipated, you can legally choose where you live, but you might still find that you cannot sign a lease or build credit until you turn 18. The emancipation process can take several months or up to a year, and may cost money in the form of court fees and other expenses. Usually, the best way to learn about emancipation in your state is to contact a lawyer. You may also find information at your county family court. We can look up legal aid resources that may be able to help you with the process. Please do not hesitate to call or chat if you have questions, need legal resources, or need to talk. We can explore your situation, go over all your options, and come up with a plan and resources to deal with your situation over the phone or on live chat. We are looking forward to hearing from you soon, and wish you the best of luck.

  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Is it possible to get emancipated if one biological parent agrees to it and the other does not? If so how does that work?

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod15
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hi there,
    Thank you for writing to us here at National Runaway Safeline (NRS). We understand it takes great courage to reach out, and we appreciate you sharing a little bit about what’s going on. It seems there is a lot that you are faced with right now and you’re feeling like leaving is one of your only options. It seems you want to know some information on runaway laws.
    While we are not experts on the law, 18 is generally the age that an individual may leave home without parent permission. If you are under 18 and leave home, your parent/guardian may file you as a runaway and you may be returned home but its unlikely you would be put straight into juvie. Usually greater consequences are reserved for chronically runaway or out of control youth. Also, those you stay with may run the risk of being charged with harboring a runaway. For more specifics on the law, the local non-emergency police or legal aid may better answer legal questions.
    We are not legal experts, but we can help you get a general sense of how emancipation works. Our general understanding is some states offer formal emancipation statutes while others do not unfortunately. Laws vary depending on your location, but in many states a minor can petition the court for emancipation to take responsibility for their own care before they turn 18. Generally speaking, courts are wary about granting emancipation. In most cases, you would have to prove in court that you have an income and can care for yourself financially, and that you are able to live separately from your parents. It also helps to be in good standing at school. The court will also factor in the mental and physical welfare of your parents in order to establish your best interest. Usually your legal guardian would have to agree to this in court. Once you are emancipated, you can legally choose where you live, but you might still find that you cannot sign a lease or build credit until you turn 18. The emancipation process can take several months or up to a year, and may cost money in the form of court fees and other expenses. Usually, the best way to learn about emancipation in your state is to contact a lawyer.
    We are here as support to help through this challenging time. We can best help by phone or chat as NRS is unable to respond more than twice by email to assist you. If you would like to talk more in detail please call or chat soon.
    Our contact information is 1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929); www.1800runaway.org (click on the chat button).
    If you are at risk of any danger or feeling unsafe, we encourage you to reach out to 911 or seek emergency assistance immediately.
    Be safe,
    NRS

  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Hey, im 16 and I want to get emancipated ill try to keep this short and sweet. I live with my biological father and my step mother my biological mother has been out of the picture since I was around 10. However, I had been in contact with her recently and I told her about the emancipation and she agreed to it but my father on the other hand does not agree with it. I have been thinking about emancipation for approximately 3 months now and im positive I wanna go through with it, it truly is what's best for me and my happiness. Im mature and responsible enough to take care of myself now looking back at my childhood you would understand why I have to be as mature as I am now growing up I lived with my biological mother and my siblings we always moved place to place and we had lived in section 8 at one point my mother was never home and it wasn't for work purposes she could never keep a job for a long period of time so that left me taking care of my younger siblings. I thought that moving with my biological father would be better and it was for a period of time we were not moving place to place I have food to eat and clothes on my back but most of the things I own are the things I had bought for myself I don't ask my parents for anything id rather get it myself growing up how I did I never got anything handed to me like other kids so I always have had to work for what I wanted. Not to mention I have a great paying job as well so financially I can take care of myself. Everything was good until I started growing up more my biological father and my step mother say "I have an attitude" but how can I have an attitude if Im always in my room? my father also made me stop going to work he took my phone away and threatened to make my life hell shortly after that I had found an old phone and I used it to contact a family member I asked if I could stay with her until I had got my own apartment and I get emancipated she agreed with it my father found out before I could tell him about it and called the cops and told them I was trying to run away which wasn't the case at all well the cops weren't any help either the cop and my father both had said I either had to stay in this household or go to juvenile. I don't know what to do. My parents wont let me leave or get emancipated accept my biological mother they don't let me go anywhere or do anything I cant even have friends I can't do things normal kids should be able to do I feel trapped. My step mother has kids of her own and my father treats them very differently other family members have said the same thing on multiple occasions. How am I supposed to get emancipated if my father called the cops and said I was trying to run away, I can't leave or go anywhere, my father took my phone so I cannot contact anyone? I need help figuring out what to do

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod15
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hi there,

    Thanks for reaching out to us and sharing a little bit about what's going on. We are sorry to hear your mom is making you shoulder so much responsibility at home and is verbally abusive. Just so you know, you could file a report on the verbal abuse if you wish. You can do that through your state's child abuse reporting hotline, through us, or through www.childhelp.org (1-800-422-4453). You certainly don't deserve to be abused in any way.

    You bring up the topic of emancipation. As you may already know, emancipation requires going through the court system and usually involves proving to the court you can take care of yourself independently from your parents/guardians. Each state's emancipation laws are different, however. We can't really say one way or the other regarding how pregnancy might affect emancipation. The best thing to do to get more information about what the process is like in your state would be to contact a lawyer. You can usually ask a few legal questions at no charge. If you'd like further assistance we can provide you with some legal aid organization numbers in your state. All you'd need to do (for both the resources or to talk to us generally) is call our 24 confidential hotline at 1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929) or chat with us via the chat feature found at the top of our website: www.1800runaway.org.

    All the best,
    NRS

  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Im 16 and i want to get emancipated. My mother is outof it i look after the house and my sibling but shes still verbally abusive. I have a reason why i dont wang to be here but she wont let me get a job so i cant prove that i can be financuallg stable while livingwith her. I would stay with my boyfriend of 3 years and his parents. Would pregnancy help or hurt my case and how would i go aboit emancipation if i cant get a job here .nw

    Leave a comment:

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