Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Can I leave my home at 16 without my parents' consent?

Collapse
X
  •  
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • ccsmod0
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hi there,

    You mentioned wanting to know how you can leave home before turning 18. The easiest way to leave home is with your guardian's permission. We understand that might be challenging, however, maybe there’s another family member, relative, or a family friend who could help to communicate how you’re feeling to your mom. The second way is through Child Protective Services if safety is a concern. Lastly, you can also look into emancipation options. In most states you need to be at least 16 to be considered and demonstrate that you can support yourself financially and independently. Emancipation often can be a lengthy process and may even cost some money for court fees. We would be happy to look into legal resources if that’s something you are considering.

    Please reach out soon so that we may offer support and resources to you. Our number is 1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929).

    Be safe,

    NRS

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Hi I am 16 and I was living with a abusive father but now at my grandparents house I was wondering if I would legally be able to live with my uncle with or without my grandparents consent?

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod0
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hey there,

    We're sorry you are faced with this right now, and it's totally understandable you want to protect your sister. Unfortunately, if she left home without their permission, they could file a runaway report with the police and have them pick her up and bring her home. They could also charge you with harboring a runaway. The best option would be to get their permission for her to stay with you. You can always reach out to us directly, through phone or chat, to discuss the situation in more detail.

    Best of luck,
    NRS

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Hi so my parent are insanely Christian and they kicked me off of all my policies because they found out I had kissed a guy. I am 19 almost 20 and I'm looking at moving out but I want to take me 16 year old sister with me because she is a teenager doing teenager things and if my parents found out I dont know what they would do. If I did try to take her could my parents force her to stay with them and could we get in trouble for living on our own?

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod0
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hi there,

    You mentioned wanting to know how you can leave home before turning 18. The easiest way to leave home is with your dad's permission. We understand that might be challenging, however, maybe there’s another family member, relative, or a family friend who could help to communicate how you’re feeling to your dad. The second way is through Child Protective Services if safety is a concern.

    You don't deserve to be hurt in any way. If you are at risk of any danger or feeling unsafe, we encourage you to reach out to 911 or seek emergency assistance immediately. You may also be able to report any mistreatment to CPS. Child Help USA 1-800-422-4453 www.childhelp.org is an organization that helps protect minors from being harmed. They can tell you more about how CPS could respond to your situation. If you ever need assistance calling out to CPS to make an abuse or neglect report please call is at 1-800-RUNAWAY.

    Lastly, you can also look into emancipation options. In most states you need to be at least 16 to be considered and demonstrate that you can support yourself financially and independently. Emancipation often can be a lengthy process and may even cost some money for court fees. We would be happy to look into legal resources if that’s something you are considering.

    Please reach out soon so that we may offer support and resources to you. Our number is 1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929).

    Be safe,

    NRS

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I'm 16 and live with my dad in Wisconsin. I want to switch and live with my mom. But my dad has full custody of me. My dad and I have been getting into some really big blow out these last couple of months. I've run away twice and was forced to come back home even though I'm afraid of what my dad may do to me. The cops have done nothing to help me they called a social worker who just told me to go home and get counseling. I've gotten cps called on my dad for hitting me in the mouth which resulted in me slamming my head into a metal rod leaving a mark. The cops documented the events and the mark. My sister has called cps multiple times on my father but nothing has happened. I'm trying everything I can do to get out. I've thought about running away again but I'll be forced to come back to my dad's. How can I get out of my household fast?

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod1
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hey there,

    Thank you for reaching out to the National Runaway Safeline. Even in the best of family situations, being pregnant and having parents who won’t listen and over control you is very stressful. You also mentioned that your baby will be added to an already crowded living situation where food supply might be unstable. With your pregnancy, you now have the added consideration of what living situation will be best for your unborn child. In your favor, it sounds like your boyfriend and his family are being very supportive and might help alleviate some of your stress.

    As far as legal options, your parents have the legal responsibility to define where you live until your 18th birthday. You mentioned that you do not want to get Child Protective Services involved because you will not be able to choose to you live with your boyfriend’s family. There may be a legal option called “emancipation” in your location that will allow you the right define where you want to live. Emancipation usually requires the youth to prove they are self-sufficient including having long term employment. If you do have employment, it might be a worthwhile exercise to consider the additional support you may need once your baby arrives. Managing a job and taking care of your newborn will obviously be a factor if you decide to go forward with this option. Getting emancipated involves going to court which you have to prove your financial independence. It can be both time consuming and can be expensive and your parents would have to be included in the court proceedings. Most localities offer free legal aid services either through non-profit or governmental agencies that explain the legal processes that is followed in your area. If you need help finding local legal aid options, you are welcome to contact us on our 24-hour support line – 1-800-Runaway (1-800-786-2929).

    Building on your wish to spend more time with your boyfriend’s family, another option is to try to improve communication between your parents and your boyfriend’s parents. This is something you can discuss with your boyfriend as what would help build trust between all the members of your future baby’s extended family. Another option would be to seek the support of a family counselor to help this communication improve. You can access to this sort of support, as well as gain possible prenatal health support by contacting Planned Parenthood – 1-800-230-7526.

    Thank you for sharing your situation with all the forum participants. Hopefully, others will be able to use this information to their benefit as well. Your focus on reducing your stress in your living situation for you and your baby is an important priority. We appreciate you turning to the National Runaway Safeline in considering options to help reduce your stress.

    Be safe,
    NRS

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I wonder this question alot. My parents are super controlling over me. Im 16 and pregnant. I have a great place to stay (with my boyfriend) my parents put alot of stress onto me. We live in a 3 bedroom trailer with 7 people. There's hardly food here. If i say something to cps or anything I'll be taken. I don't wanna be taken. I wanna be placed with my boyfriend and his family. They told me if i wanted to move in that I could and I would have everything I need. My parents are set I will quit school because of him but he's actually the only one pushing me to do great. I started making As and Bs when we got together and i still am. But my parents don't wanna believe that. When they argue I cry because I can't get away from it. I need the best leagal option to get out! And once I'm out I KNOW things will be better! Please help!

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod1
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hello,

    Thank you for reaching out to NRS – it takes a lot of courage to share your story. We’re so sorry to hear that you don’t feel loved. You deserve to feel safe, comfortable, and loved in your own home.

    If you think you might be experiencing emotional/verbal abuse, Child Help (www.childhelp.org) might be helpful to you. They have lots of information about child abuse and the child abuse reporting process. You can also call us at 1 (800) RUN-AWAY if you want to learn more about reporting, want help in filing a report, or just want to talk. We’re 24/7 and confidential. We’re here to listen, and we’re here to help. You’re not alone in this.

    You know your situation better than anyone else, so if you believe that running away is your best option, we will do our best to support you and keep you safe. Running away is a status offense, not a legal one, which means that it’s something you can’t do because of your age. In other words, running away in and of itself cannot get you in legal trouble. If you run away, if your parents file a runaway report, and if the police find you, they will attempt to take you home. If that happens and you tell them that you don’t feel safe at home, they’ll call Nevada Child Protective Services and a social worker will conduct a full investigation. Also it is worth mentioning that if you run away, your parents file a runaway report, and the police find you living in someone else’s home, your parents have the right to press harboring charges against them. Although it isn’t guaranteed that whoever helps you will face these charges, it is a possibility.
    Another option is what’s called an Alternative Living Arrangement. If your parents give their written permission, you can live with someone else (the family in California, for example) until you turn 18.

    Again, we are so sorry that you’ve had to go through all of this – but you’re not alone. Please don’t hesitate to call at 1 (800) RUN-AWAY or chat with us at www.1800runaway.org.

    Good luck and stay safe.
    NRS

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Hey my name is Andrew and I feel unloved where I live it's like I can't do anything the way my parents want it and there constantly blaming everything on me theres our days where we don't argue but it's like 4 times a week we argue and I'm trying to figure out how to get myself out of this I'm 15 now but on February 17 I'll be 16 is there anyway I can leave without getting into trouble I live in Nevada but I'm trying to go back to California where i know everyone and know my place around I'm tired of being treated poorly by my parents.....do you know anyway I can leave my family without getting arrested or brought back to my parents

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod13
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hi there,

    Thanks for contacting NRS and we appreciate you sharing a little bit about what’s going on. We want you to know that we are here as support to help you with figuring out your next steps in this difficult situation. Asking for help was really responsible and smart of you. We are sorry to hear things are so unstable at home. You deserve to live somewhere that makes you feel safe and supported. Getting space from difficult situations can be helpful in processing your feelings and thinking about what you would like to do moving forward.

    If you leave without permission your parents do have the right to report you as a runaway. Running away is not illegal, but it is a status offense. This means that if your parents know where you are staying then they can have the police return you home. Any consequences you face for leaving would be from your parents rather than the police.

    We truly want to be a support for you as you navigate this challenging time. Please do not hesitate to reach out anytime by phone at 1-800-786-2929 or use our live chat services at www.1800runaway.org to talk more about your situation and explore your options.

    Stay safe,
    NRS

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I'm 16 in Portsmouth NH I need a break from my house. I where to leave to go over a friends house would I get in trouble with the Police?

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod16
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hi Breanna,

    Thank you for reaching out to NRS. We are sorry to hear that things are tough at home right now. It sounds like you are in a really unhappy living situation.

    I understand that you want to leave home when you turn 18 in June. We aren’t legal experts, and each state has different laws pertaining to youth. In effect, we can’t give you legal guidance on whether or not you can change schools and residences without parental consent.
    There are various family counseling resources that you might consider in order to help you with this difficult conversation. Your school counselor might be able to offer counseling suggestions or referrals in order to help navigate this family conflict.

    The thing you want to keep in mind is that once you do choose to run and/or leave, how that is going to impact your relationship with your family. Being okay with what happens is completely up to you. Having a solid plan about what you are planning on doing it might be a good idea so that you can think about what is reasonably possible for you to do and want isn’t. Factoring in these kinds of thoughts into your overall plan, again can possibly help you in your choice (i.e, where are you going to be living [long term vs. short term], what's your role in the house, are you going to be working/going to school, will you be paying your share of the bills/rent, what happens if you realize down the road that you can't live together and they kick you out, etc). It's certainly a jump step to make and we want you to be as safe as possible when making your decision.

    Again, we’re really glad that you reached out to us. It takes a lot to ask for help, and you are trying to figure out your options, which is really good to see. If you would like to talk further about your situation, please do not hesitate to call or chat with us.

    We’re here to listen, here to help.

  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    hi im 17 will be turning 18 in june20th of 2020 and i was wondering if i turn 18 i can transfer to a different school without my parents permission and to move out the night i turn 18 and go move in with my aunt? i hate living with my dad and his girlfriend and she just had another baby last week and ever since she has moved in with us all i do is clean up after her and my dad and they think im thier freaking slave to them. yesterday when i got home from school i had a chore list to do and then my aunt called me and asked what was wrong and then busting down in tears bc i am tired of livuing there with them i wish that i can move out now since im 17 but i cant. i need help or advice on what to do
    Last edited by ccsmod7; 01-10-2020, 02:04 PM. Reason: identifying info

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod13
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hi there,

    Thanks for contacting NRS and we appreciate you sharing a little bit about what’s going on. We want you to know that we are here as support to help you with figuring out your next steps in this difficult situation. Asking for help was really responsible and smart of you. We are sorry to hear things are so unstable at home. You deserve to live somewhere that makes you feel safe and supported.

    It sounds like your mom's constant abuse and invasion of your privacy have made home incredibly overwhelming. Only you know when leaving is the best decision for you. If you do decide to leave it is important to plan for things such as where you will stay, how you will financially support yourself, and how you will take care of your mental health. Reaching out to people close to you to strengthen your support system can give you a safe outlet for how you are feeling and help you brainstorm a variety of options. A good place to start can be a counselor or social worker at school who are trained to give you non-judgmental support and can be an advocate for you as you navigate this challenging situation. Additionally, you can confide in other friends or family members who might be able to offer you a safe place to stay.

    If you are not quite ready to reach out to someone in person, there is an organization called Child Help that supports and advocates for young people in abusive situations. You can contact them at 1-800-422-4453 or go to www.childhelphotline.org to speak with a counselor about ways to prioritize your mental health and involve trusted adults to intervene in your situation.

    We are available 24/7 to listen and help as much as possible. We can talk more in-depth about your situation and explore your possible options if you call our hotline at 1-800-786-2929 or use our live chat services at www.1800runaway.org.
Previously entered content was automatically saved. Restore or Discard.
Auto-Saved
x
Insert: Thumbnail Small Medium Large Fullsize Remove  
x
or Allowed Filetypes: jpg, jpeg, png, gif
x
x
Working...
X