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can i move out at 17 legally

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  • #61
    Hi, I'm 16 and turn 17 in less than a month. My dad has never been around and my mom has had to watch over me and my 5 siblings for at least 8 years on her own. I understand that it can be stressful for her, but I've been dealing with a lot of shaming from her and it seems almost like she doesn't see everything i do for her and the rest of the kids. I'm always stressed out and busy caring for them as if I'm mom. I haven't been allowed to get a job or my license at all and i doubt i will be either. So my question is, if i moved in with a close friend near school, still made sure my grades were good, and got a job to support myself, could i move out now? Or would i get brough back and possibly have my friend's parents charged? I live in the Springfield area of Oregon.

    Comment


    • ccsmod15
      ccsmod15 commented
      Editing a comment
      Hi, thanks for reaching out to NRS, we’re here to listen and to help.
      It sounds like you’re in a pretty frustrating situation. From you shared, it seems like you’ve been taking on a lot of responsibility, caring for your five siblings from a very young age yourself.
      Your siblings and your mom are very lucky to have that help, and your siblings to have someone who cares so much for their well-being. You must be very strong to take on that kind of responsibility at your age.
      It sounds like you feel that your mom doesn’t appreciate the help you’ve provided, and instead has been adding to your stress with what she says. You also indicated that you haven’t been allowed to get a job to help earn money or a license, which could make it feel like you’re being restricted from things you want to do elsewhere. It sounds like it’s gotten to the point where you feel like it would be better to get out of your current environment and into one at your friend’s where you can continue your schooling and just worry about being a 16-/17-year old.
      While we’re not legal experts, broadly speaking, while you’re under the age of legal majority – which varies by state -- your legal guardian/parent generally has the decision-making authority over where you would stay. According to the online resource SEX Etc.org, (https://sexetc.org/action-center/sex-in-the-states/) you wouldn’t be considered an adult until age 18.
      While you going to live elsewhere without mom’s permission may not have serious legal consequences for you, it could have some for any adult with whom you’d stay: if your mom pressed the issue, there could be potential for harboring a minor charges. Again though, we’re not legal experts, so you may want to talk to a legal expert about your situation. If you need help locating one, we have a database of legal resources by state to whom we could refer you.
      You may also want to consider talking with a legal expert regarding your legal rights in Oregon, as there could be other options available to you, even up to emancipation. You mentioned that your Dad is out of the picture, but if there was another relative nearby who you could stay with, if your mom would be more open to you staying with a relative, that could be an option for you.
      Another option to possibly explore is family counseling with your mom. Sometimes counseling can help to improve the home situation and communication with kids and their parents/guardians. Or, you may also want to consider talking with your mom about how you feel about how she talks to you/treats you with a neutral 3rd party acting as a mediator to the conversation. Sometimes that can help youth and their parents to have more difficult conversations without the conversation breaking down. That’s actually a service we also offer here at NRS – a three-way conference call in which we’ll act as a mediator between you and your mom to express how you feel about the situation at home. It could be to talk about how you feel about her treatment of you, or to help you ask her about getting permission to live elsewhere.
      We hope this information has been helpful to you. If you’d like to discuss any of these options in more detail, please don’t hesitate to contact us by phone at 1-800-RUNAWAY, or through our online chat forums, we’re here 24 hours a day/7 days a week. Best of luck to you!

  • #62
    hi my name is caidyn, i was wondering can i move out when im 16 or 17 because my mother and me have different standards and i feel like im responsible enough to leave and i also i just can deal with this anymore

    Comment


    • ccsmod3
      ccsmod3 commented
      Editing a comment
      Hi there,

      We are glad you are reaching out to us in your time of need because we are here to help! While we aren’t legal experts, we can share a few pieces of knowledge that may help you think of an option that works for you.

      In your message, you mentioned wanting to move out of your mother’s house. Do you think your mom would give you permission to leave home? We are asking because if you were to leave home without permission before becoming an adult (which is legally 18 in most states), your mother could involve the police and file a runaway report. While running away isn’t illegal, it is considered a status offense. That means that if she knows where you are, she could tell the police to bring you back home or press charges against anyone that takes you in (since “harboring a runaway” is considered illegal). A way to avoid police involvement is to have parental permission (such as a note, text, or email that you could show to police if need be). Another option may be to find out if the police station near you would take a runaway report for someone who is 17. Sometimes the police won’t take a report for people so close to adulthood, but that depends on the rules of that particular location. If you feel comfortable doing so, you have the option to anonymously call the non-emergency number for your local police station and ask if they would take a report. Depending on their answer, you can plan your next step.

      You also mentioned that you and your mom have different standards. Have you talked to your mom about those standards and how they make you feel? If you have tried before, what worked and what didn’t? Sometimes switching the approach may help to move the conversation along. One options that may be of benefit to you is our conference call service through our hotline (1-800-786-2929). Basically we would talk with you on the phone and then reach out to your mother. After talking with her we would join the calls and stay on the line to help keep the conversation constructive. Other options that we know of are to write a letter, or ask a trusted adult (like a family friend or relative) to talk to your mom for you.

      Like we said before, we are here to help, but we are also here to listen. If you would like to talk through any of the options we mentioned or would like to brainstorm other ideas, out hotline is available and confidential 24/7.

      Best of Luck!

  • #63
    Hi I am 16 Turning 17 In 26 Days And I Live In Fort Worth Texas And i Am Ready To Move Out Me And Mom Always Argue And She Always Threatens Me I Dont Want To Get Cps Involved But Im Ready To Go. I Heard At 17 You Can Runaway Or Leave The House Without Getting Arrested I Heard The Police Will Take The runaway Report But Won't Look For You. So Can i Leave ?

    Comment


    • #64
      Reply: Hi I am 16 Turning 17 In 26 Days


      Hello,
      Thank you for writing to us here at the National Runaway Safeline.

      We understand it takes great courage to reach out, and we appreciate you sharing a little bit about what’s going on. It sounds like you are trying to decide what to do about leaving home or staying but have some questions. Though we can understand being frustrated by a situation it’s good that you are taking your time in making a decision. Unfortunately we can't predict what he police might do about looking for you if you were to run away. To get that information you would have to contact the non-emergency number to your local police department and ask about the runaway laws in your state or you might ask if you left home at 17 without parental consent would you be considered a runaway?
      Running away is you decision to make but it does raise questions as to how will you survive?
      Where will you stay? How will you eat? How do you keep yourself safe? One Basic question you might ask of yourself is: Will running away make my situation better or worse? That’s a lot we know.
      It sounds like you are frustrated with the situation and running away is something you are seriously considering. We understand.
      It is also important that you remember to exercise self- care.

      We want you to know that we are here as support to help you through this challenging time.
      We would like to be of assistance to you if we can. It is times like these that it would be nice to have a listening ear.
      We can best help by phone or chat as NRS is unable to respond more than twice by email or bulletin for assistance.
      If you would like to talk more in detail and share more about how we can help specifically, please call or chat soon.

      Our contact information is 1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929); www.1800runaway.org (click on the chat button).
      If you are at risk of any danger or feeling unsafe, we encourage you to reach out to or seek emergency assistance immediately.

      Take care,
      NRS


      We hope this response was helpful! We’d love to hear from you about your experience using our crisis email/forum. Your feedback plays an important role in helping us improve our services to youth and families. Please click the link to fill out our survey: Your Opinion Matters to Us
      Please remember you can reach us directly by calling our 24 hour hotline, 1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929) or through our Live Chat.

      National Runaway Safeline
      info@1800runaway.org (Crisis Email)
      1-800-RUNAWAY (24 Hour Hotline)

      Tell us what you think about your experience!
      https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/YourOpinionMattersToUs

      Comment


      • #65
        hi im dustin can you move out at 17 bc my bday is 2 mouths away plz help or answer i really want to i live in IN elkhart

        Comment


        • ccsmod16
          ccsmod16 commented
          Editing a comment
          Thank you for reaching out to the National Runaway Safeline. It sounds like you might be going through a tough time, but we are here to support you and help you in any way we can.

          We’re not legal experts here at NRS. Generally it’s not illegal to leave home, but your parents could file a runaway report, the police could get involved, and they could bring you home. The people you’re staying with could potentially get in trouble for having you stay there. Some police departments don’t accept runaway reports for 17 year olds, but the policies may vary by each department. You could consider calling your local nonemergency police department to ask about their policies. We also have legal aid resources here if you have specific questions about the laws in your state.

          It sounds like you are considering leaving home. If you do decide to leave home, you could consider thinking about ways to make sure you stay safe. You could explore ways you would pay for food, shelter, clothing and other necessary things. You could think about how long you would stay away, where you would stay, and what things would be like when you return. You could consider what you would do if you felt that you were in danger or had an emergency.

          If you haven’t already, you could consider reaching out to a trusted adult, relative, worker/teacher/counselor at your school for help and support. You could also consider talking to your parents about how you’ve been feeling. Just so you’re aware, we have a conference calling service here where we could help mediate a conversation between you and your parents.

          There are also many resources that could help you find a safe place if you’re in need or help you with anything else you may need. If you want to talk more about what’s been going on, or if you would like more information about resources, you can call us at 1-800-RUNAWAY (1-800-786-2929) or chat with us online.

          Again, thank you for contacting us. You’ve shown a lot of strength by reaching out for help. If you ever need anything in the future, please feel free to call us or chat with us online. We’re always here to listen and here to help.

      • #66
        Hi,
        I moved to Houston with my dad almost two years ago to have a better life. Turns out it’s the complete opposite. My dad was not in my life much because of my mom. Now that I live with him I know why my mom kept us from him. Me an de my dad don’t get along at all. He is constantly throwing things from the past in my face and always seems to keep me from trying to move on. I’ve had a deep struggle with depression and i really think that I am doing so much better. My dad never believed me when I would tell him how I felt. He would tell me that I’m just doing it for attention. My dad told me that once I’m 17 I could move out. I will be 17 in a month but I have no where to go. Could you please help me find options because I don’t want to end up on the streets. Especially here in Houston. I want to keep going to school as I only have one more year left.

        Comment


        • ccsmod2
          ccsmod2 commented
          Editing a comment
          Hello,

          Thank you for reaching out to us at at the National Runaway Safeline. We are sorry to hear that you are having trouble living with your father and that he has not been very supportive. Since you turn 17 in a month and your father is giving you permission to leave, we recommend getting that documented properly. We are not legal experts but we would not want you to get into any trouble leaving at 17 since the age of majority in Texas is 18.
          We commend you for having one year left for school and getting this far especially after suffering from depression, it shows how strong you are. If you ever do feel depressed again, we recommend reaching out to NAMI (the National Alliance on Mental Illness) at 1-800-950-6264.
          Lastly, you mentioned wanting to discuss places where you can stay. We can over options with you such as a friend, family, possibly getting a job part time and look into local resources. For that, we would need additional information and recommend giving us a call at 1-800-786-2929 or chatting with us at www.1800runaway.org

          We want you to know that we are here to listen and support you in way that we can and available 24/7.

          Take care,
          NRS

      • #67
        Hi I am a 17 years old female and live in kings mountain North Carolina I have a 6 month old little girl and my mom kicked me out so I was wondering is it against the law if I go stay with the babys father and parents in Florida.

        Comment


        • ccsmod3
          ccsmod3 commented
          Editing a comment
          Hi there,
          Thanks for reaching out to the National Runaway Safeline. It sounds like you are going through a really tough situation right now and its unfortunate to hear that your mother has kicked you out. We aren’t legal experts, but from what we know, you are still considered a minor, therefore your mother is responsible for you until you are 18 and her kicking you out can be seen as a form of neglect. You do have the right to report the abuse to Child Help at 1-800-422-4453. You can either do it yourself or call into us directly and we can support you through it. It is hard to say the result of reporting, but if you call in you can ask what the process might look like.
          If you are still in connection with your mother, you would be able to go move with your boyfriend and family if you were to get permission from your mother (written form is encouraged) to be able to go there with the most minimal chance of legal consequences. Something you should also look into is the legalities surrounding if you are emancipated in North Carolina due to being a parent. You could call into us and we could see what local legal resources are in your area or reach out to your local police non-emergency line to ask information.
          We are here for you and will support you in anyway that we can. Please feel free to call into us directly as we can talk further about your situation and find resources that are best for you in your area. Stay strong and you are not alone in this! Our hotline (1-800-RUNAWAY) and chat are open 24/7.

      • #68
        So I am a 17 year old working two jobs. I recently have been getting into minor trouble, not as a bad as my friends at all, and this is my first suspension. Because I’m suspended, my parents have taken away my phone, make me sit at a table and do chores, then make me go to work or school. I need to leave this house. They make me very sad and angry and I cannot stand it anymore. I wanna know if I would be able to leave, and if there would be dangerous consequences. I’m going into the army, and live in a military installation. Would there be any effect on my future if I moved out or ran away? And would the MP’s have jurisdiction outside of my work place and my school, or is it only on post? I live in Colorado btw.

        Comment


        • ccsmod9
          ccsmod9 commented
          Editing a comment
          Hi there,
          Thank you for writing to us here at National Runaway Safeline (NRS). We understand it takes great courage to reach out, and we appreciate you sharing a little bit about what’s going on. It seems there is a lot that you are faced with right now and you’re feeling like leaving is one of your only options. It seems you want to know some information on runaway laws.
          While we are not experts on the law, 18 is generally the age that an individual may leave home without parent permission. If you are under 18 and leave home, your parent/guardian may file you as a runaway and you may be returned home. Also, those you stay with may run the risk of being charged with harboring a runaway. Typically an MP has no custody over you therefore has no authority over your life right now. As far as running away and having it affect your military goals we would not know it might be a good idea to ask your MP. For more specifics on the law, the local non-emergency police or legal aid may better answer legal questions.
          We are here as support to help through this challenging time. We can best help by phone or chat as NRS is unable to respond more than twice by email to assist you. If you would like to talk more in detail please call or chat soon.
          Our contact information is 1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929); www.1800runaway.org (click on the chat button).
          If you are at risk of any danger or feeling unsafe, we encourage you to reach out to 911 or seek emergency assistance immediately.
          Be safe,
          NRS

      • #69
        Hi. I turned 17 in January on the 22 and I was wondering if I could move out legally without parent consent and what would happen if the police were called in Gainesville tx?

        Comment


        • ccsmod9
          ccsmod9 commented
          Editing a comment
          Hi there,
          Thank you for writing to us here at National Runaway Safeline (NRS). We understand it takes great courage to reach out, and we appreciate you sharing a little bit about what’s going on. It seems there is a lot that you are faced with right now and you’re feeling like leaving is one of your only options. It seems you want to know some information on runaway laws.
          While we are not experts on the law, 18 is generally the age that an individual may leave home without parent permission. If you are under 18 and leave home, your parent/guardian may file you as a runaway and you may be returned home. Also, those you stay with may run the risk of being charged with harboring a runaway. For more specifics on the law, the local non-emergency police or legal aid may better answer legal questions.
          We are here as support to help through this challenging time. We can best help by phone or chat as NRS is unable to respond more than twice by email to assist you. If you would like to talk more in detail please call or chat soon.
          Our contact information is 1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929); www.1800runaway.org (click on the chat button).
          If you are at risk of any danger or feeling unsafe, we encourage you to reach out to 911 or seek emergency assistance immediately.
          Be safe,
          NRS

      • #70
        Hi I am 17 years old in 6 months away from turning 18 I’ve been wanting to move out for good reasons with dealing with my father getting in my face and mentally abusing me.He’d only get in my face for when we argue when I don’t do what he asks and I’m not the only one which my brother as well deals with it and he’s 19 almost 20 he still treats him like a child,my father acts as if he’s King of all and we can’t disobey him.My mother’s friend had given us some information about in the Texas law 17 year olds can move out.what should I do?

        Comment


        • ccsmod6
          ccsmod6 commented
          Editing a comment
          Thank you for contacting the National Runaway Safeline. We are sorry to hear that your father has been acting aggressively hostile towards you and not respecting your or your brother’s independence.

          While we are not legal experts, we do have experience with runaway situations. It is not necessarily illegal to runaway, but our understanding is that in the state of Texas, police do pursue runaway reports until the age of 18. That means that if you were to leave home as a minor, your guardians would be entitled to file a runaway report with the police. That would allow the police to pick you up, notify your guardian, and take you home should they encounter you. If you were staying with someone, your parents would be entitled to press charges against them for harboring a runaway, which is usually considered a misdemeanor offense. However, if your mom and dad have equal custody, if your mom knows and approves of where you are, it would seem unlikely for the police to intervene as your guardian would know where you are and that you are safe.

          If you want to talk more specifically about what is going on and what options you have, please don’t hesitate to reach out to us on our 24/7 hotline 1-800-786-2929 or on chat at 1800runaway.org.

          Take care,
          NRS

      • #71
        Hello, I graduate in May, so almost in a month. But I don’t turn 18 until August. I live in Sioux City Iowa, & I have a steady job. Actually two jobs. My parents are divorced w/ one having legal custody. I was wondering if I were to move out after graduation, if I would be searched for?

        Comment


        • ccsmod1
          ccsmod1 commented
          Editing a comment
          Hey there,

          We aren’t legal experts here at NRS, but generally speaking, if you do opt to leave your home your parents can file a runaway report, which is essentially a missing person report. Running away is a status offense; this means that it isn’t illegal, but it’s something you can’t do while still a minor. If a runaway report is filed and you are located by the authorities you will most likely be returned to your parents. Since you are planning on leaving so close to your 18th birthday your local police may not bring you back; to find out your local authorities' policy on runaways you can call their nonemergency line at 311.

          If you’d like to go over what’s going on in depth, or if you’d like to explore other options that you may have available to you, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-800-RUNAWAY. You can also chat us by clicking on the “CHAT” button on top of our homepage. We’re open 24/7 and here to listen and support you in any way we can.


          All the best,
          NRS

      • #72
        I live in Texas,female,I want to move out at 15 or 16.My mom said it's fine since my family lives where I want to be.Is it possible I could move there with parental consent?

        Comment


        • ccsmod1
          ccsmod1 commented
          Editing a comment
          Hey there,

          Thanks so much for reaching out to us and sharing a little bit about what's going on. We aren't legal experts here at NRS, but in general, you should be able to live anywhere if you have parental consent. It may be worthwhile to contact a local legal aid office to see if there is anything that needs to be done in terms of transferring custody, etc. You can find a local legal aid group by going to lawhelp.org.

          If you’d like to go over what’s going on in depth, or if you’d like to explore other options that you may have available to you, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-800-RUNAWAY. You can also chat us by clicking on the “CHAT” button on top of our homepage. We’re open 24/7 and here to listen and support you in any way we can.

          All the best,
          NRS

      • #73
        I’m 16 and i have issues at home all the time, i live in Orlando, FL. is it legal to runaway from home and go to a house that you know you’re better there than at your own house? and my parents keep saying that they’re going to call child services on me, what would happen if i actually leave my house without legal permission?

        Comment


        • ccsmod6
          ccsmod6 commented
          Editing a comment
          Hello and thank you for contacting the National Runaway Safeline. We’re sorry to hear that issues at home have you feeling like you want to run away. While we are not legal experts, we do have a great deal of experience working with runaways. First of all, it is our understanding that running away is not considered illegal as in you will not be arrested or legally punished for doing it. Running away is considered a status offense, meaning that it is something that you are not supposed to do much like smoking a cigarette underage. Second, if your parents are referring to your state’s child protective services or department of children and family services, these organizations do not exist to punish children for misbehaving. CPS and DCFS exist to protect children from abusive, harmful, or neglectful treatment.

          If you did leave home without your parents’ permission, your parents would be entitled to file a runaway report with the police because you are a minor. This would mean that if the police encountered you, they would typically be allowed to notify your guardians and return you home. If you were staying with someone while there was a runaway report out on you, your parents would have the option to press charges on that person for “harboring a runaway”. Again, we are not legal experts, but this is typically considered a misdemeanor offense and would require your parents to hire a lawyer and take the other person to court.

          If you would like to talk more about what’s going on and what other options there might be, please don’t hesitate to reach out to us on our 24/7 hotline 1-800-786-2929 or on chat at 1800runaway.org.

          Take care,
          NRS

      • #74
        hi I just turned 17 a few days ago, but as far as my living situation I want to leave. I was adopted at a very young age with my little brother. things the past few years have been rough. I know my parents deeply care about me but they just don't support me or anything I do. I feel like they are constantly judging me and it hurts. my best friend and her mom said I could move in with them, they bitterly live down the street from my current home now so I won't be alone or in another city. I want to be able to start my independence as soon as possible. I've always been good on my own. but I don't want to be dragged out of my friends house by the police and have to go back home. if this plan doesn't work, everything at home will be even worse. I love my parents but I just can't stay and live like this what do I do?

        Comment


        • ccsmod9
          ccsmod9 commented
          Editing a comment
          Hi there,

          You mentioned wanting to know how you can leave home before turning 18. The easiest way to leave home is with your guardian’s permission. We understand that might be challenging, however, maybe there’s another family member, relative, or a family friend who could help to communicate how you’re feeling to your guardians. The second way is through Child Protective Services if safety is a concern. Lastly, you can also look into emancipation options. In most states you need to be at least 16 to be considered and demonstrate that you can support yourself financially and independently. Emancipation often can be a lengthy process and may even cost some money for court fees. We would be happy to look into legal resources if that’s something you are considering.

          Please reach out soon so that we may offer support and resources to you. Our number is 1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929).

          Be safe,

          NRS

      • #75
        My daughter is 17 years old and will be graduating early. She wants to move out and share an apartment with a friend and split the bills. Is she legally able to do this without me getting into trouble with the law? I will still be there to help her if she needs it. She will still be coming back home periodically. She will have our full support she just wants to live somewhere else and try to make it on her own. Legally can I allow her to do this? If it doesn't work out for her the way she hopes it will she is always welcome to come back home. I am by no means kicking her out. I would rather she stay home anyway but she seems pretty headstrong about the idea. What are her rights and mine?

        Comment


        • ccsmod0
          ccsmod0 commented
          Editing a comment
          Hi there,
          Thank you for writing to us here at National Runaway Safeline (NRS). We understand it takes great courage to reach out, and we appreciate you sharing a little bit about what’s going on. We need you to know that we are not legal expert nor are we affiliated with the police but to our knowledge, yes, if you give your daughter permission to live apart from you that is fine. The only thing that could be worth noting is that you are still legally responsible for her. If you have more questions about this matter we would strongly suggest that you contact your local non-emergency police.
          Again, thank you for reaching out.
          Best wishes,
          NRS
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