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Moving from my mothers house, to my Fathers

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  • Moving from my mothers house, to my Fathers

    Hello, I am 15, and will be 16 soon. Life with my mother is very hard as she can get very violent and angry when told no, or something doesnt go her way. She constantly insults me and tells me I'm just like my father. Thats good in an odd way because my father is one of the best men I've ever known! Mental illness runs in her family, and it is believed by her family she has it as well. But I, a lonely child, am expected to deal with it. I love my mom, but i only see my dad every other week, and she violates the divorce contract so i dont see him holidays. I know 15 and maybe even 16 is a bit young, but i wanted to know what legal options i could take to move in with my father, at least by age 17? Id love to spend more time with him, and at least want to spend my last year as being considered a child with him. He is fully able to support me. I live in El Paso, Texas, but i have no idea if i leave at age 17 if thats counted as running away.

  • #2
    RE: Moving from my mothers house, to my Fathers

    Hello there –

    Thank you so much for taking the time out of your day to reach out to us here at the National Runaway Safeline on our public bulletin board. From your post, we can see that you have very similar questions to a lot of our callers and you’re looking for some answers. It seems like there must be a lot going on in your life and at home right now that your considering leaving your home. No one deserves to be treated badly by anyone, especially a family member. You always have the right to report any abuse to your local police department or child protective service in your state. If you don’t feel comfortable with filing a report against your mother, you can always call us anytime you want. There is always someone here to help you. Hopefully we can help you come up with some ideas on what your next step might be.

    Like we tell a lot of our callers and/or people that email us, the laws on that specific subject of running away vary from state to state, so our advice would be call your local non-emergency police number to get more information on that. You could ask hypothetical questions that they can answer for you. Generally what typically happens in each state is if you are below the legal age of majority (18 in most states except Alabama and Nebraska [19 or upon marriage], and Mississippi [21]), your parents or legal guardian would be able to make a runaway report in the event that you do run away right away. Since it’s only considered a statues offense and not a crime to run away, the only thing that would happen is that the police will pick you up and bring you back home. This is of course if you had any interaction with the police directly or if they stopped you to ask you a few questions.

    Since it sounds like both of your parents aren’t on the same page with letting you move from one house to the other, just leaving might be a little difficult. One parent usually gets awarded primary custody (your mother) and the other secondary custody (your father); assuming since you’ve been living with your mother. So if your father were to just come and get you or if were to ran away to live with him, he might be get in trouble with the law himself. If it’s not in the agreement that you are even allowed to live with him, according to the judge’s discretion, your mother could press charges against him and take him to court to get all his right removed. Technically your father might be able to do the same if she isn’t holding up to her side of the divorce agreement (i.e not letting you go over on the holidays).

    If you give us a call we can get to know your situation better to help you figure out what your next best step might be. We could even do a conference call with your mom and try to advocate for you, but that’s up to you. We never tell anyone what to do and all calls are confidential. Our number is 1-800-RUNAWAY (1-800-786-2929) and we’re here 24/7. If your mom turns your phone off you can try to use a public phone or email us at [email protected]. We hope to hear from you!
    Please remember you can reach us directly by calling our 24 hour hotline, 1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929) or through our Live Chat.

    National Runaway Safeline
    [email protected] (Crisis Email)
    1-800-RUNAWAY (24 Hour Hotline)

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