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16 year old in NY wants to move in with friend

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  • 16 year old in NY wants to move in with friend

    My friend is 16, 17 in January, and she has a lot of problems at home, her parents yell at her for trivial things, refuse to take her places, and never pay rent so they're constantly moving. They berate her and say no one likes her and that they never wanted her, and they always put her siblings above her. There's little to no physical violence as far as I know, but the verbal abuse and her home life is becoming too much for her.

    In September I'm going to be moving from Long Island(where we both live currently) to upstate NY, and she wants to come with me and stay with me to get away from her family. She's also willing to wait until she is 17 to do so.

    Is it possible for her to come live with me? What would the process be for that to happen? Can it happen without her parents consent?

    Thanks in advance-
    Sarah

  • #2
    re: 16 year old in NY wants to move in with friend

    Dear Sarah,

    Thank you for reaching out to us. It sounds like your friend’s living situation has become very stressful for her. We’re sorry to hear that she’s going through this, no one deserves to hear berating things at home. You asked about the possibility of your friend moving to upstate NY with you, and while we’re not legal experts, we will do our best to provide you with helpful information.

    Because the laws vary from state to state, we can’t tell you with certainty what the process for her to come live with you without parental consent might be. If she does decide to go with you before she is considered a legal adult, her legal guardians have the right to file a runaway report with their local police department. Running away isn’t illegal, it is considered a status offense, similar to a parking ticket. It’s important to keep in mind that, although running away isn’t illegal, harboring a runaway is. If a youth is found by their local police, they are returned to their legal guardian. If you are charged with harboring a runaway, that carries more serious consequences that can vary from state to state.

    If you’d like more detailed information, it’s often helpful to reach out to your local police non-emergency number. They can tell you when a youth is considered a legal adult, what their procedure is regarding runaway reports, etc. If you’re interested in finding out how custody works, we can connect you with your local child protective services office so that they can better inform you on what that process is. It sounds like you’ve done your best to support your friend through what sounds like a very tough time with her and her family. We wish you all the best as you and your friend consider your options. Please feel free to reach out to us at 1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929), we are here to support you 24/7.

    Stay Strong,

    NRS
    Please remember you can reach us directly by calling our 24 hour hotline, 1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929) or through our Live Chat.

    National Runaway Safeline
    info@1800runaway.org (Crisis Email)
    1-800-RUNAWAY (24 Hour Hotline)

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    • #3
      My friend who is 16 who is about to be 17, is trying to leave his home due to his living conditions. Is there any way he can leave home legally?

      Comment


      • ccsmod10
        ccsmod10 commented
        Editing a comment
        Hey there,

        Thanks so much for contacting us, it looks like you care a great deal about your friend and his well-being. It seems like there are some serious issues going on at your friend’s house. If there is any abuse going on in the home, your friend can always call 911 for emergency assistance. Another option that he has is to file a child abuse report. Child Help USA 1-800-422-4453 www.childhelp.org is an organization that helps protect minors from being harmed.

        Laws regarding minors and the age of majority (adulthood) can vary greatly from state to state. It could be a good idea to tell your friend about us. We might be able to help him think about the options that may be available to him and help locate any resources that can help.

        If you or your friend would like to go over what’s going on in depth, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-800-RUNAWAY. You can also chat us by clicking on the “CHAT” button on top of our homepage. We’re open 24/7 and here to listen and support you in any way we can.

        All the best,
        NRS
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