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Im 16 and want to move out and live with my boyfriend but my parents are super strict

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  • ccsmod16
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hi,
    thanks for reaching out; we are glad that you did. It sounds like you want to move in with your boyfriend but you are 16 and your parents won't let you.
    Part of the problem is that until you are the age of majority in your state, they are legally responsible for you. They really can't allow you to go at 16 unless they go to court and give up their parental rights. It's very complicated.
    If you want to talk more about this, please reach out via live chat through this website or call us at 1-800-RUNAWAY, 24/7
    We hope to hear from you soon.
    NRS

  • Guest
    Guest replied
    I am 16 and I want to move in with my boyfriend but I cant bc of my parents

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod13
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hi there,

    Thanks for contacting NRS and we appreciate you sharing a little bit about what’s going on. We want you to know that we are here as support to help you with figuring out your next steps in this difficult situation. Asking for help was really responsible and smart of you. We are sorry to hear things are so unstable at home. From what you shared, your parents are making home a dangerous place to live. You deserve to live somewhere that makes you feel safe and supported.

    Generally speaking, your parents are your legal guardians until you turn 18, so they can decide where you live. If you do choose to leave without permission, your parents can report you as a runaway to the police. Running away is not illegal, but it is a status offense. This means that if your parents know where you are staying then they can have the police return you home.

    The easiest way to leave home as a minor is with your parents’ permission. In this case, they would be allowing you to live somewhere else where you are safe and being cared for. A helpful step is to start reaching out to friends and family members you might be able to stay with. Sometimes having an adult advocate on your side can make communicating your needs more effective to your parents. Perhaps an adult family member, a friend's parent or a counselor at school can talk to your parents with you about your experience at home and the possibility of you leaving.

    You do have the option to report the situation at home to child protective services. Child Help is an organization that advocates for young people in abusive and unhealthy situations. You can contact them at 1-800-422-4453 or go to childhelphotline.org to talk more about what the reporting process would look like for you.

    We truly want to be a support for you as you decide on your next steps. We are available 24/7 to listen and help as much as possible. Please do not hesitate to reach out again by phone or chat if you would like to talk more in-depth about your situation and explore your options. You can contact us by phone at 1-800-786-2929 or use our live chat services at www.1800runaway.org.

  • Guest
    Guest replied
    i will turn 16 in june of 2020 and i have extremely strict parents who threaten to hit me and drink daily, i have tried leaving but the cops deamed that i was not old enough and could get sent to juvy, what should i do?

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod15
    commented on Guest's reply
    Thank you so much for reaching out to us. It sounds like you are in a really difficult situation at home and you are looking for an alternative living situation. It seems like your dad is unwilling to take you in and your mom would not let you live with your nana, but you want to live with your nana.

    You said you were 13, which means that you are a minor. That means there are only certain ways for you to legally be able to live elsewhere. Getting your guardian/parent to allow you to live elsewhere is an option. You had said that you are not allowed to leave, so this could be difficult. If you would like help facilitating this conversation between you and your parent, you could always call our hotline and we would be able to help facilitate a conversation between you and your parents. Another option would be to contact Child Protective Services and be removed from the home. You said your mom drinks a lot, and there is a possibility this could be considered abuse or neglect. This is usually not the first step in CPS investigation, but this is a possibility.

    Either of these are possible options. If neither sounds realistic, just leaving is also a possibility. It’s really important to think before making this decision. Writing this means you are trying to get helpful information. Since you are 13, you are considered a minor, and your parents could make a runaway report. Running away is not a crime, but the police’s top priority is reuniting you with your parents. If you were staying with your boyfriend or nana, there is a possibility that they could be charged with harboring a runaway.

    We are here to listen and help you figure out all the options you have. If you want to talk to someone more in depth about any of this, feel free to call our hotline 24/7 or chat with us. We are completely confidential and here to support you in any way we can.

    -NRS

  • Guest
    Guest replied
    im 13, my mam drinks all the time and my dad doesn't want me to live with hi. I have a boyfriend and a nana I an live with but im not allowed is there any ideas on how to mover here

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod1
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hey there,

    Thanks so much for reaching out and sharing a little bit about what’s been going on, we know that it takes a lot of courage. It sounds like living with your dad was really scary and we're relieved to hear that you are OK. You resilience and self-reliance at such a young age is very admirable and you should be proud of yourself. We’re not legal experts here at NRS, so we can’t give you any legal advice regarding emancipation. Emancipation is an option in the state of Texas but there are certain rules and qualifications about who can and cannot be emancipated. We have the following on file about emancipation in Texas but please take note that it may not be the most updated:
    (a) A minor may petition to have the disabilities of minority removed for limited or general purposes if the minor is:
    (1) a resident of this state;
    (2) 17 years of age, or at least 16 years of age and living separate and apart from the minor's parents, managing conservator, or guardian; and
    (3) Self-supporting and managing the minor's own financial affairs.
    (b) A minor may file suit under this chapter in the minor's own name.

    Emancipation can often be a lengthy and expensive process. It may be a good idea to work with a legal aid group (they offer low cost or free legal services) for assistance through this process. You can find a legal aid group near you by going to https://www.lawhelp.org/find-help/.

    If you’d like to go over what’s going on in depth, or if you’d like to explore other options that you may have available to you, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-800-RUNAWAY. You can also chat us by clicking on the “CHAT” button on top of our homepage. We’re open 24/7 and here to listen and support you in any way we can.

    Stay safe,
    NRS

  • Guest
    Guest replied
    I am turning 16 in four days I already live on my own I stay at a friends house all my school stuff clothes supplies I have to get myself my mom don’t have custody of me my dad does I haven’t lived with my dad in two years when I left him he told me he didn’t want to deal with me anymore anyway I left because I was tired of both the physical and emotional abuse I want to be emancipated and live Texas would I be able to move to Texas get emancipated there or would I have to wait till I’m emancipated

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod1
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hey there,

    Thanks so much for reaching out and sharing a little bit about what's going on, we know that it takes a lot of courage. It sounds like you care about your girlfriend a lot and no one should have to go through what she did. It can be really hard to deal with this alone and sometimes it’s helpful to reach out to additional agencies for support. One really great resource for all survivors of sexual assault or abuse is RAINN (Rape Abuse Incest National Network). She can call them any time 24/7 at 1-800-656-4673, or go to www.rainn.org to use their online hotline. RAINN is the National Sexual Assault Hotline and has a lot of services, support, and resources that she may find helpful.

    We aren't legal experts here at NRS, but generally speaking, if she does leave home her parents can file a runaway report. Running away is considered a status offense meaning that it isn't illegal but it's something that can't be done by a minor. If your girlfriend leaves home and is located by the police they will most likely make her return home. Of course, it may be beneficial if your girlfriend were to contact us directly to go over the situation in depth and discuss other options that may be available. We can be reached by calling 1-800-RUNAWAY or via our online chat option.

    Be safe,
    NRS

  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Hi I’m 14 almost 15 on July 30 and my girlfriend got raped and she is 13 and she doesn’t think her family will support her so would it possible for her to move in with me and my family

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod6
    commented on Guest's reply
    Thank you for reaching out to the National Runaway Safeline. Your parents might be talking about transferring their legal guardianship of you to your boyfriend. This would give him power of attorney over you and authority over you as if he were your parent. In this situation, it would actually give him more authority over you than your parents. That kind of exchange of power over your independence and freedom can easily be abused and you may want to consider the lasting legal consequences such an action might have. In order to begin that process, it would probably be best to go to contact your county’s juvenile court. If your parents are on board with you living away from home and do not want to be responsible for your guardianship, it would probably be a good idea to consider getting yourself emancipated. While emancipation can take a very long time, if you have parental permission it is usually not.

    While we are not legal experts, we would be happy to refer you to a legal resource that could answer any questions about the specifics in your state of either of these options. If you are interested in those resources or talking in greater detail about what your situation is, please don’t hesitate to reach out on our 24/7 hotline at 1-800-786-2929 or on chat at 1800runaway.org.

  • Guest
    Guest replied
    im 16 and my boyfriend is 18 , my parents are okay with me moving in with him . But they want a paper with a legal grandship to him?

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod1
    commented on Guest's reply
    Hey there,

    Thanks so much for contacting us, it takes a lot of courage to reach out and share your story. Running away is a big decision and it can be very stressful to figure out what you want to do. It’s great to hear that your boyfriend supports you. If you go to stay at his house without prior permission from your parents, he could be charged with harboring a runaway, which is a misdemeanor. Penalties for harboring a runaway vary from state to state, police officer to officer, and how your parents view the situation. If you’d like to go over what’s going on in depth, or if you’d like to explore other options that you may have available to you, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-800-RUNAWAY. You can also chat us by clicking on the “CHAT” button on top of our homepage. We’re open 24/7 and here to listen and support you in any way we can.

    All the best,
    NRS

  • Guest
    Guest replied
    I'm 16 and i want to move in with my boyfriend but he lives in a apartment, can i still move in with him. He is also 21

    Leave a comment:


  • ccsmod0
    commented on Guest's reply
    Thank you for reaching out to us at the National Runaway Safeline. It sounds like you are in a difficult situation, and we understand it takes courage to reach out for help. The National Runaway Safeline is located in the United States of America (USA). Our knowledge of helpful community based resources and our understanding of youth in crisis related laws is limited to the USA. If you are located in a country outside of the USA, you can use this link to find a youth helpline in or around your country: https://www.childhelplineinternation...pline-network/.
    We hope that by reaching out to a local resource, you are able to get the support you need from an organization that understands the laws and circumstances that affect youth in your country.
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